marcus westbury

my life. on the internets.

marcus westbury header image 2

Culture Shock – New TV Series

March 25th, 2008 by marcus

ABC1 Logo

A new series, Culture Shock, is in the early stages for ABC TV (Australia). All going to plan (which these things rarely do in my limited experience) we should begin filming around around July and the series should air in about October 2008. Yes, I already know that the title is a bad clich̩ Рit was a working title that accidentally stuck.

Below is an extract from a very early draft blurb…

Culture Shock is a 3 part half hour series for Tuesdays at 10 on ABC1 written and presented by Marcus Westbury.

Picking up from the themes explored in Not Quite Art, Culture Shock takes the audience on an insightful and amusing journey through an increasingly fragmented cultural landscape – where the Internet and communications have given all of us a set of cultural choices and influences unimaginable even a decade ago. Culture Shock finds an eclectic and amusing mix of artists, writers and musicians whose work has found their audiences through networks well outside the traditional Australian structures of cultural authority. Along the way it asks a deeper question about what might happen to a society that is gradually losing its set of common cultural reference points?

Over three episodes, Marcus Westbury takes us to meet Australian artists and creators exhibiting and performing internationally while remaining largely unknown in their own communities, to see how curators and administrators deal with influences, audiences and expectations that can come from almost anywhere on earth, to meet musicians headlining major tours and festivals in Europe and America while rarely receiving Australian radio airplay, and into the world of blogs, politics and ideas where increasingly polarised and polticised communities often talk loudly amongst themselves.

Culture Shock takes us into art, music and writing that sits within both high and low culture. It looks at the spectrum of specialist cultures and niche audiences unleashed globally by communications technology. With rapid change in art and cultural influences occurring all the time, this series is not about art that is dependent on technology but on the new cultural landscape that has grown up because of it.

Responses to and thoughts about the series idea are very welcome. I am also very keen to find artists, creators or arts-people (I’ve never really liked “arts workers” for some reason) who may be doing something that illustrates the series ideas. Feel free to contact me if you have any thoughts or suggestions.

Similar Posts:

Tags:   · · · · · · · 18 Comments

  • Delicious
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter

Leave A Comment

18 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Nicholas Roberts Apr 8, 2008 at 5:34 pm

    In Newcastle, for leads on creatives and cultural entreprenuers, talk to Greg Keegan on Overt Fashion and David at Cooks Hill Books. Between Greg (surfing, fashion) and David (books, intellectuals) you’ve the interesting aspects of Newcastle covered.

  • 2 admin Apr 8, 2008 at 5:38 pm

    Somehow I think i will need a REALLY good excuse to focus too much on Newcastle for this series. Then again you never know…

  • 3 Minski Apr 8, 2008 at 6:44 pm

    Sounds interesting. I am now based in OS and have for some time been particularly interested in the growing influence creative expatriates have on their own country or culture of origin both from artistic and political perspectives. There was a good RN feature I heard a while ago that may be useful for you. Ill track it down. Another thought is the fact, like in Australia, international artists can often find better opportunities for their art, in a professional forum, than in their own country based on their internationalism.

  • 4 Nicholas Roberts Apr 8, 2008 at 7:13 pm

    personally, I find the Internet allows a more coherent, organic and fluid cultural life than that dictated by geography. The cultural story online is one of informal social networks that provide a more seemless experience than that of offline. The internet life is personal and personalised. Offline cultural life is owned by the dominant institutions: government, media etc. Having said that, the internet is mainstream media, is an advertising media, and the social networks that people use (MySpace, FaceBook, LinkedIn etc) are monetising. So the dominant ideology will adapt, penetrate the attention of all but the most hard-working dissidents and misfits. How will it do this? Own the Web ? One product: Google Ads.

  • 5 Nicholas Roberts Apr 8, 2008 at 7:29 pm

    last one, and I’ll go away; “Along the way it asks a deeper question about what might happen to a society that is gradually losing its set of common cultural reference points?”. Presumably you dont mean common cultural reference points like consumerism, mindless entertainment and distraction. Because the internet will provide for that. Also, the vast majority of internet use is on some big sites, Google, MySPace, FaceBook, NineMsn etc… No much chance to lose the afore mentioned common cultural reference points: consumerism and distraction. Of course, there will be a veneer of genuine Aussie culture, online Ray Martin style…. Universal values will remain barely disguised below the surface the true cultural reference points.

  • 6 mitchell Apr 8, 2008 at 9:18 pm

    Sounds interesting, but the binary of niche vs mainstream is more complex than this. As you frame it here it’s partly about success and fame – being big OS but unknown here… but the question is, unknown to who? Who is the “community” … is it 100 people or 100,000? According to “long tail” theory small niches are big business…

    And surely the “common cultural reference points” were only ever made up by Robert Hughes or John Singleton… at least with networked niche culture we can do it ourselves!

    enjoyed the first show a lot BTW… cheers!

  • 7 Elizabeth Apr 9, 2008 at 8:59 am

    Yeah I don’t like the title.

  • 8 chris hanrahan Apr 9, 2008 at 10:24 am

    I’m sure you know of the gent i’m about to put forth – but Wade Marynowski seems to fit your bill to a tea sir. Incidentally the knights are looking pretty good and have been unlucky 2 weeks in a row.

  • 9 Adam R Apr 13, 2008 at 1:36 am

    The Drones. Australia’s best band touring in exile.

    http://www.myspace.com/thedronesthedrones

  • 10 Rachel Carroll Apr 14, 2008 at 10:27 pm

    I am currently working with a group of 6 artists who are working beyond the current technology dependant market. We have gone back to the roots of art making and aim to meet people at a pure level of aesthetic appreciation; where the tactility of art highlights, nature and human interaction at a new level. Our next series is focused on global warming and the sea. At Chowder Bay, Mosman Sydney we are uniting with scientists at SIMS – the Sydney Institute of Marine Science to cover a broader appreciation and understanding of the sea. Through art and science a new educational platform is explored where art is no longer a pure aesthetic exploration but a domain for education. Something that hasn’t been explored at such length since Da Vinci mapped the human form in all its glory.
    True art shows the everyday as if it is being viewed for the first time. The excitement of a new discovery is paramount in this experience.
    If you would like to see all our current explorations I am happy to email you some images directly or you can come to one of our meetings . We meet once a month in a Manly cafe…The Artichoke.
    Conact Rachel 0423982349
    cheers
    Can’t wait for your next series!

  • 11 Rachel Carroll Apr 14, 2008 at 10:28 pm

    I am currently working with a group of 6 artists who are working beyond the current technology dependant market. We have gone back to the roots of art making and aim to meet people at a pure level of aesthetic appreciation; where the tactility of art highlights, nature and human interaction at a new level. Our next series is focused on global warming and the sea. At Chowder Bay, Mosman Sydney we are uniting with scientists at SIMS – the Sydney Institute of Marine Science to cover a broader appreciation and understanding of the sea. Through art and science a new educational platform is explored where art is no longer a pure aesthetic exploration but a domain for education. Something that hasn’t been explored at such length since Da Vinci mapped the human form in all its glory.
    True art shows the everyday as if it is being viewed for the first time. The excitement of a new discovery is paramount in this experience.
    If you would like to see all our current explorations I am happy to email you some images directly or you can come to one of our meetings . We meet once a month in a Manly cafe…The Artichoke.
    Contact Rachel 0423982349
    cheers
    Can’t wait for your next series!

  • 12 karen May 11, 2008 at 1:59 am

    “to meet musicians headlining major tours and festivals in Europe and America while rarely receiving Australian radio airplay”

    So I take it you’ve already included Curse ov Dialect? They are awesome beyond comparison. It’s just a shame no one in Australia can recognise this.

  • 13 Tracey Meziane Benson May 11, 2008 at 11:38 am

    Might be worth exploring some of the International events where online artists converge – ISEA, would be a good one – and will be happening in July in Singapore. When I was at ISEA2004 in the middle of the Baltic Sea, I ran into about half a dozen digital artist friends from Australia that I had not physically seen for years!!! Same with N5M festival in Amsterdam – where I believe we met ;-)

  • 14 Meg May 11, 2008 at 1:20 pm

    If you haven’t already (and Marcus I may be revealing my ignorance of the first series here!), recommend you consider talking to Emile Zile. Multimedia whiz from Melbourne, now living in Amsterdam, very interested and talented artist, with a kinda craft/situationist approach but a strong affinity with all things netty and webby and generally technical.

  • 15 Meg Mundell May 11, 2008 at 1:22 pm

    Hiya Marcus. Just tried to post in some detail, but somehow it got wiped. So here is the gist of it, without the detail: recommend you consider talking to *Emile Zile*, currently based in Amsterdam. Email me if you want more detail on him, I don’t trust this newfangled technology.

  • 16 Hayley West May 11, 2008 at 8:19 pm

    hi marcus,
    i emailed you through facebook sometime ago (just after NQA) but i never got a reply, i guess you get many…
    i reckon you should contact Rob Curgenven (you can google him), he’s an interesting sound artist who lives kind of in Darwin/Katherine & Milan. he’s done many interesting projects here in Australia and overseas (Berlin especially) but seems to get more gigs o/s. a very good friend and a fabulous artist in my opinion!
    have a look at my blog too, you’ll see that i (like many in Darwin) feel we are overlooked in our own country (down south anyway – we still travel a lot to regional centres) and find ourselves in Asia doing projects, because of our location, and more people seem interested! i also am interested in online projects o/s and with fellow artists.

    good luck with culture shock.
    cheers, hayley

  • 17 alex May 12, 2008 at 1:29 pm

    there could be something interesting to explore in the remote indigenous community film/radio production context… amazing work comes out of an absolutely unique setting – also huge emerging youth film movement is a fascinating feild, esp when the people making films are not literate (other than visually)… anyways just a thought xx

  • 18 Cultcha Shock! « Aussie Arts May 27, 2008 at 4:54 pm

    [...] so if you know someone who is doing something along those lines, drop Marcus a line at his blog. You should also read the rest of his posts. They are very [...]